Wednesday, September 24, 2014

VADNAGAR ~ MODI'S HOME TOWN WAS ANCIENT BUDDHIST SITE

VADNAGAR ~ MODI'S HOME TOWN WAS ANCIENT BUDDHIST SITE ...
Photo: JEWELS OF BHARATAM ...SERIES[TM]

[PLEASE KINDLY SHARE IF YOU CARE ]

VADNAGAR ~ MODI'S HOME TOWN WAS ANCIENT BUDDHIST SITE ...

Vadnagar in Gujarat, was a major centre of Buddhism in Western India when the famous Chinese traveller, Huen Tsang or more correctly, Xuanzang (602-664 AD), visited it.
 
 The town figures in the accounts of the 7 Century Chinese traveller, Xuanzang, who called it 'Anandapur'.

It was in 2009, that excavations by the Gujarat Department of Archeology revealed the existence of a Buddhist monastery, although a statue of the Buddha in the sitting posture, dating back to the second or third century AD, had been accidentally discovered in a farmland near Vadnagar in the late 1980s.

According to India Today, 24 seals had been discovered at the monastery site till 2012, exciting the curiosity of renowned archeologists like Robin Cunningham of the University of Durham, and Mark Kanyor of Wisconsin University.
 
'Stupas at the site reveal three different stages of an evolving Buddhist architecture, from cylindrical and circular shapes to square and moulded plinths,' the magazine said in 2012. Two more monasteries had since been discovered.

"The new revelations in Vadnagar prove that Gujarat was an important Buddhist centre. Both the stupas and the monasteries correspond to three periods of Buddhist development, spread from the first to the seventh century AD," the magazine quoted Y.S.Rawat, Head of the Gujarat Government Department of Archeology, as saying.

Apart from Vadnagar, Xuanzang, the Chinese traveller, had visited other Buddhist sites in Gujarat, such as Bharuch, Vallabhipur (near Bhavnagar) and Kutch. But earlier archeologists like Alexander Cunningham (the first Director General of the Archeological Survey of India), had not excavated in these places.
Vadnagar in Gujarat, was a major centre of Buddhism in Western India when the famous Chinese traveller, Huen Tsang or more correctly, Xuanzang (602-664 AD), visited it.

The town figures in the accounts of the 7 Century Chinese traveller, Xuanzang, who called it 'Anandapur'.

It was in 2009, that excavations by the Gujarat Department of Archeology revealed the existence of a Buddhist monastery, although a statue of the Buddha in the sitting posture, dating back to the second or third century AD, had been accidentally discovered in a farmland near Vadnagar in the late 1980s.

According to India Today, 24 seals had been discovered at the monastery site till 2012, exciting the curiosity of renowned archeologists like Robin Cunningham of the University of Durham, and Mark Kanyor of Wisconsin University.


 'Stupas at the site reveal three different stages of an evolving Buddhist architecture, from cylindrical and circular shapes to square and moulded plinths,' the magazine said in 2012. Two more monasteries had since been discovered.

"The new revelations in Vadnagar prove that Gujarat was an important Buddhist centre. Both the stupas and the monasteries correspond to three periods of Buddhist development, spread from the first to the seventh century AD," the magazine quoted Y.S.Rawat, Head of the Gujarat Government Department of Archeology, as saying.

Apart from Vadnagar, Xuanzang, the Chinese traveller, had visited other Buddhist sites in Gujarat, such as Bharuch, Vallabhipur (near Bhavnagar) and Kutch. But earlier archeologists like Alexander Cunningham (the first Director General of the Archeological Survey of India), had not excavated in these places.

Photo: JEWELS OF BHARATAM ...SERIES[TM]

[PLEASE KINDLY SHARE IF YOU CARE ]

VADNAGAR ~ MODI'S HOME TOWN WAS ANCIENT BUDDHIST SITE ...

KIRTI TORAN .... The torans left behind by the Solanki dynasty @ Vadnagar in Gujarat, was a major centre of Hindu worship.

The Kirti ‘Toran’, called the ‘Kirti Stambha’ (Temple Arch) in other regions, is a religious form that flourished under the Solanki rule in Gujarat. Two of the finest examples are at Vadnagar. At one time, both must have been connected with a temple, not a trace of which now remains , interestingly, dismantled parts of a similar but much bigger arch lie in the vicinity. These two arches may have been part of a big temple complex.

The Toran of Vadnagar in Gujarat Of the two, the one that stood at what was the edifice of Rewah, is a truly imposing structure. Almost complete and a typical example of its kind, it rises to a total height of 40 feet. It consists of two massive and elaborate columns, supporting a wide cornice, above which rises a vaulted pediment.Built by a Solanki ruler, the toran in red and yellow sandstone has carvings of battle and hunting scenes.

Many images of gods and goddesses on the arch now stand disfigured. They were, according to historians, vandalised by the armies of Allauddin Khilji, the first Muslim invader to raid north Gujarat during the Sultanate period.KIRTI TORAN .... The torans left behind by the Solanki dynasty @ Vadnagar in Gujarat, was a major centre of Hindu worship.

The Kirti ‘Toran’, called the ‘Kirti Stambha’ (Temple Arch) in other regions, is a religious form that flourished under the Solanki rule in Gujarat. Two of the finest examples are at Vadnagar. At one time, both must have been connected with a temple, not a trace of which now remains , interestingly, dismantled parts of a similar but much bigger arch lie in the vicinity. These two arches may have been part of a big temple complex.

The Toran of Vadnagar in Gujarat Of the two, the one that stood at what was the edifice of Rewah, is a truly imposing structure. Almost complete and a typical example of its kind, it rises to a total height of 40 feet. It consists of two massive and elaborate columns, supporting a wide cornice, above which rises a vaulted pediment.Built by a Solanki ruler, the toran in red and yellow sandstone has carvings of battle and hunting scenes.
Many images of gods and goddesses on the arch now stand disfigured. They were, according to historians, vandalised by the armies of Allauddin Khilji, the first Muslim invader to raid north Gujarat during the Sultanate period.